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Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area '' © Melissa Newbury
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USA Parks
USA Parks
Washington
Washington
North Cascades Region
North Cascades Region
Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area
Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area
LAKE ROOSEVELT NATIONAL RECREATION AREA
LAKE ROOSEVELT NATIONAL RECREATION AREA
1008 Crest Drive
Coulee Dam, Washington   99116

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Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area

The Upper Columbia River is rich in cultural and natural significance. For more than 9000 years, people have gathered along the banks of the river to fish and trade with each other. Missionaries and explorers for the Hudson Bay Company and the Northwest Trading Company mapped the area and developed relationships with the tribes, which lived here. In 1941, damming of the Columbia River as part of the Columbia River Basin project created a 130-mile long lake. Named for President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the lake is now the largest recreation feature in the Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. Opportunities for boating, fishing, swimming, camping, canoeing and visiting historic Fort Spokane and St. Paul's Mission are highlights of visiting Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. <P>
FACILITIES AND ACTIVITIES OVERVIEW
Day-UseFishingyes
 Huntingyes
 Hiking Trailyes
 Picnickingyes
Camping
Campgrounds:

Evans Campground : Open All YearWater not always availablePhone : 509-738-6266

First come- first serve basis. Thirty-four sites suitable for tents and RVs of all sizes. No more than two units (one RV and one car for example) and 10 people per site. Lots of shade, amphitheater and free scheduled activities during summer season. No hookups. Free dump station and water for RV tanks.

Fort Spokane Campground

No more than two units (one RV and one car for example) and 10 people per site. Lots of shade, amphitheater and free scheduled activities during summer season. No hookups. Free dump station and water for RV tanks. Comfort stations. Fort Spokane museum open in summer.

Gifford Campground, Open All Year Phone509-738-6266Details : First come-first serve basis. Forty-seven sites suitable for tents and RVs of all sizes. No more than two units (one RV and one car for example) and 10 people per site. Some shade, free scheduled activities during summer season. No hookups. Free dump station and water for RV tanks.

Hunters Campground, Open All YearPhone 509-738-6266Details : First come- first serve basis. Thirty-nine sites are suitable for tents and most RVs. No more than two units (one RV and one car for example) and 10 people per site. Some shade. Free scheduled activities during summer season. No hookups. Free dump station and water for RV tanks.

Keller Ferry Campground, Open All YearPhone 509-633-9188

Details : Reservations can be made for May 1 through September 30, otherwise it is a first come-First serve basis. Fifty-five sites. Some are suitable for tents and some for most RVs. Reservations may be made by contacting the National Recreation Reservation Service at (877) 444-6777. No more than two car units ands and 10 people per site. Some shade. Free scheduled activities during summer season. No hookups. Free dump station and water for RV tanks. This is a very busy and often full campground. Look for alternatives when planning.

Kettle Falls Campground : open All YearPhone 509-738-6266

Details : Reservations can be made for May 1 through September 30 other wise its first come- first serve basis. Eighty-nine sites suitable for tents and RVs of all sizes. Reservations may be made by contacting the National Recreation Reservation Service at www.ReserveUSA.com and through the call center at (877) 444-6777. No more than two units (one RV and one car for example) and 10 people per site. Lots of shade, amphitheater and free scheduled activities during summer season. No hookups. Free dump station and water for RV tanks.

Porcupine Bay Campground : Oen All YearPhone 509-725-271

Details : First come-first serve basis. Thirty-one sites. Some are suitable for tents and some for most RVs. No more than two units (one RV and one car for example) and 10 people per site. Some shade. Free scheduled activities during summer season. No hookups. Free dump station and water for RV tanks. Comfort stations. Water availability is contingent on lake level. This is a very busy and often full campground. Look for alternatives when planning.

Spring Canyon Campground: Open All YearPhone: 509-633-9188

Details: Reservations can be made for May 1 through September 30 otherwise its first come- first serve basis. Eighty-seven sites. Some are suitable for tents and some for most RVs. Reservations may be made by contacting the National Recreation Reservation Service at www.ReserveUSA.com and through the call center at (877) 444-6777. No more than two units (one RV and one car for example) and 10 people per site. Some shade. Free scheduled activities during summer season. No hookups. Free dump station and water for RV tanks. Comfort stations. Water availability is contingent on lake level. Contact station is open on weekends June-August.
Fishing
Fishing:

One of the most popular sport fish in the northern and central United states has developed a similar reputation in Washington, and specifically at Lake Roosevelt national Recreation Area, in the last couple of decades. Known for its exquisite flavor and large size, this newcomer called ?walleye? is providing additional excitement and opportunity in a state already rich with fishing resources.

The walleye is not a native Washington fish, and just how walleyes originally entered the state is unknown. The first verification of a walleye in Washington was in 1962, from Banks Lake in eastern Washington. Soon afterwards, populations began to show up in Franklin Roosevelt Lake (connected to Banks Lake through a huge pipe and pump). Since then they have spread from these original sites to the remainder of the mainstemColumbia river, from near the mouth to the Canadian border.

Walleyes continued to advance to other waters in the central Columbia Basin. Using irrigation canals as frontier highways, they have established populations in Moses Lake, Potholes Reservoir, Billy Clapp Lake, Long Lake, Crescent Lake and Soda Lake. The Department of Fish and Wildlife has also stocked walleyes insome of these lakes to supplement the populations, as well as to create a new fishery in Sprague Lake.

The walleye?s appeal is certainly not its lethargic fight, although fish get so big here they can generate intense interest and excitement. Rather, it is their performance at the dinner table that keeps anglers returning, trip after trip. Many people consider walleyes to be the best-flavored white-fleshed fish in freshwater.Aficionados of yellow perch (a close relative of the walleye) might disagree, but not vociferously. Both are superb in a number of recipes with the walleye?s larger size contributing bigger portions.

A good day?s fishing for walleyes will yield several two-to- three-pound fish, with an occasional fish up to ten pounds. The current state record, caught in the Columbia River below McNary Dam in April 1990, weighed 18 pounds and 12 ounces.

One characteristic that helps identify the walleye is its large, opaque-white eyes.This feature is an adaptation to the fish?s habits and preferences, and a clue forte perceptive angler. The large eyes have extremely fine light receptivity to see prey in dimly lit waters. Walleyes evolved in turbid waters and in deep lakes andthis ability to ?see in the dark? has provided the necessary edge to survive.

Astute anglers know that this also means walleyes stay away from bright, sonneteers. When they have to come up to the surface or to shallow shore areas tiffed or spawn, walleyes look for muddy waters or they wait and move in from dusk to dawn. This is the best time to fish for them.

When walleyes reach maturity, they become highly migratory. As soon as the lakes and rivers begin to warm and thaw in early spring, walleyes make spawning journeys from their winter holding areas. Some of these migrations will cover dozens of miles to headwater tributaries. Other spawning may occur along shallowrocky lake shores, but in either instance, spawning areas are less than five feet deep. The only proven natural reproduction of walleyes in Washington is in Roosevelt Lake and intermittently in Lake Umatilla (John Day Pool).

During spring spawning runs, walleyes stack up in headwater streams and below dams and are easy prey for anglers-in-the-know. Most of the famous walleye holes throughout the country are these types of waters.

After spawning, walleyes will return to the main lake or river, staying in the shallows throughout the spring and early summer until the waters warm, then moving to deep, cooler water during the day, returning to feed at dusk. During winter, it is generally thought that walleyes hold up in deep waters until the spawning urge strikes again, but little is actually known about the winter habits of this fish.
Boats and RVs
KJ Watersports - Coulee City, WAStorage
We rent premium well maintained equipment including SKI BOATS, JET SKIS, and PONTOON BOATS We are located at Sunbanks Lake Resort outside of Electric City, which is 20 minutes from Steamboat Rock State Park, 35 minutes from Sun Lakes State Park, as well as only 5 minutes from Grand Coulee Dam. We also deliver to the surrounding areas. Call 509-681-0283 or 509-633-8079
5.4 miles from park*
Metalite Industries - Spokane, WABoat Dealer
An industry leading series of high quality, reliable, durable and complete pontoon leisure craft and work boats. These classic custom pontoon watercraft products are designed to meet the demands of owners and the public for safety, comfort and long lasting value.
78.2 miles from park*
Leavenworth Outfitters.com Outdoor Center - Leavenworth, WABoat Rentals
We want to share the nature and adventure of river rafting, kayaking, cross country skiing and snoeshoeing in the beautiful Cascade Mountains of Washington State with our honored guests.
91 miles from park*


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Nature Programs
Self-guided Activities: Did you know the oldest standing church on the Upper Columbia is right here in the park at Kettle Falls? Did you know you can still see where the old town of Kettle Falls once stood? Did you know you can walk in the footsteps of the first tribes that hunted and fished along the Columbia River as well as the soldiers that once made Fort Spokane their home? Did you know that at Spring Canyon you can stand near where a half-mile thick ice sheet blocked the river, creating a lake 400 feet above your head? Four self-guided walking trails in the park will take you back in time so you can explore the history and geology of Lake Roosevelt or simply enjoy the beauty of it?s diverse scenery and terrain.

Mission Point Trail: Only one-mile from the Kettle Falls Campground, at St. Paul?s Mission, a 1/4 mile trail combines history and nature. There are signs along the trail explaining the history of the falls, the mission, and the Hudson?s Bay Company?s influence on the area.The view of the river is rivaled only by the abundance of plants you will find along the trail.

Old Kettle Town-site Trail: Starting in the Kettle Falls Campground, this one-mile trail winds through the original town-site of Kettle Falls. You will see house foundations, sidewalks and fruit trees-landmarks of the past. The trail leads to the swim beach and playground, and boasts great blue herons, osprey, and bald eagles.

The Sentinel Trail: Located at Fort Spokane. Signs along this trail give clues to how people lived here for almost 50 years. Echoes of the past can be heard along the two-mile trail. For the adventurous, the trail climbs approximately 300 feet to the top of the bluff, providing you a spectacular view of the fort grounds and the confluence of the rivers. A free trail guide about the Indian boarding school is available.

Bunchgrass Prairie Nature Trail: The start of this ?-mile trail is in the Spring Canyon Campground. Discover wild roses, rock-eating lichens, and look closely at the different critters that call the grasslands home. A free trail guide is available at the beginning of the trail for you to use.
Area Attractions
Mount Rainier National Park, 200 miles.

North Cascades National Park, 125 miles.

Colville National Forest509-684-7000 2mi

Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife509-684-7424 2mi

Traveling in Washington State0mi

Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge509-684-8384 10mi
Things To Do in the Area
Leavenworth Outfitters.com Outdoor Center - Leavenworth, WAFamily Outting
We want to share the nature and adventure of river rafting, kayaking, cross country skiing and snoeshoeing in the beautiful Cascade Mountains of Washington State with our honored guests.
91 miles from park*
Visitor Comments, Memories and Reviews
June 28 I love the hiking area & the wild life!
The hill of the lake is great it has wild life allover it. I did one of the classes at the lake and it was so fun disexting owl pellets i even foung one of my own.!.!.!.!.
March 3 Family Fun by Bayliner21
Our family gets together every year over at Lake Roosevelt, we have been doing this for the last 8 years. All of our kids and grandkids go for an entire week of fun in the sun and relaxation.
July 15 Beautiful park with excellent facilities by Frank Carroll
This park is very scenic, has well maintained washroom facilities, play areas, swimming area, fish cleaning area, barbecue grills, picinc tables, boat launch and dock.


Directions
Plane: Spokane is the nearest city with a commercial airport.

Car: From Spokane you can get to the northern district of the park by taking Hwy. 395 north 90 miles to Kettle Falls.

State Road 25 follows along the lakeshore from the northern most boundary to Fort Spokane and Porcupine Bay. Hwy 2 can be used to get to the southern district of the park. There is a map attached to our website.

USA Parks
USA Parks
Washington
Washington
North Cascades Region
North Cascades Region
Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area
Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area