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Oregon
26

Oregon State Parks

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USA Parks
Oregon
Oregon Coast Region
Fort Stevens State Park
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Fort Stevens State Park Wreck of the Peter Iredale © Justin Gilles
Fort Stevens State Park © Rick Stasel
Fort Stevens State Park © Linda Hutton
Fort Stevens State Park © Rick Stasel
Fort Stevens State Park © Rick Stasel
Fort Stevens State Park © Rick Stasel
Fort Stevens State Park © Rick Stasel
Fort Stevens State Park © Dougtone / CC BY-SA 2.0
Fort Stevens State Park © daveynin / CC BY 2.0
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FORT STEVENS STATE PARK
FORT STEVENS STATE PARK
1675 Peter Iredale Road   97121
(lat:46.1994 lon:-123.9791) map location

Phone: 503-861-3170
Toll Free: 800-551-6949
Reservations: 503861167129
Fort Stevens was the primary military defense installation in the three fort Harbor Defense System at the mouth of the Columbia River (Forts Canby and Columbia in Washington were the other two). The fort served for 84 years, beginning with the Civil War and closing at the end of World War II. Today, Fort Stevens has grown into a 3,700 acre park offering exploration of history, nature, and recreational opportunities.

And you can help fund historic programs and restoration at the park! The Friends of Old Fort Stevens will run Wood on Wheels this summer, selling and delivering firewood right to your site. Check it out when you arrive!

Camping, beachcombing, freshwater lake swimming, trails, wildlife viewing, an historic shipwreck and an historic military area make Fort Stevens a uniquely diversified park. A network of nine miles of bicycle trails and six miles of hiking trails allow you to explore the park through spruce and hemlock forests, wetlands, dunes, and shore pine.

Coffenbury Lake has two swimming areas, a picnic area, restrooms, and a boat ramp (10 mph boating speed limit). Two other smaller lakes offer boat ramps for fishing and canoeing.

Throughout the year, you can browse through displays dating back to the Civil War at the museum, visit the only enclosed Civil War earthworks site on the west coast, and explore the gun batteries.

During the summer, watch the blacksmiths work, tour a rare 90-year old underground gun battery that served as a World War II command center, and take a truck tour of the fortifications spanning the Spanish-American War and World War II (tour available at a nominal charge).
History of the Area
Fort Stevens, located in Oregon, has a rich history that dates back to the Civil War era. It was initially constructed during this period as an earthwork battery and named after Isaac I. Stevens who served as Washington Territory's first governor.

The fort played a significant role throughout several wars including the American Civil War, Spanish-American war and both World Wars before it was decommissioned in 1947. During its active years, Fort Stevens underwent numerous expansions with additional batteries installed for protection against potential naval attacks.

One of its most notable historical events occurred on June 21st-22nd of 1942 when it became the only military installation within mainland United States to be directly attacked by enemy forces during WWII; Japanese submarine I-25 fired shells towards Fort Steven but caused minimal damage due to inaccurate aim.

After being deactivated post-WWII ,the area transitioned into recreational use under management from Oregon Parks & Recreation Department since late '50s . Today visitors can explore remnants of historic structures such as gun batteries or visit Military Museum which showcases artifacts related not just local history but also broader context about U.S defense system evolution over time.

FACILITIES AND ACTIVITIES OVERVIEW
Day-UseSwimming Beachyes
CampingPrimitiveyes
 Electric Sitesyes
 Water/Electric Sitesyes
 Full Hookup Sitesyes
Camping
During Discovery Season (October 1 to April 30), Fort Stevens has a limited amount of campsites available through the reservation system. RNW may not have all campsites available for reservations, but Fort Stevens will have campsites available on a first-come, first-served or drop-in basis. Additional loops will be opened, as necessary, to accommodate arriving campers.



Trails
1. Battery Russell Trail: This 0.8-mile loop trail is easy and suitable for all skill levels, featuring a historic military fortification site.

2. South Jetty Sand Dunes Loop: A moderate level hike of about 3 miles that offers scenic views of the Pacific Ocean and sand dune landscapes.

3. Coffenbury Lake Trail: An approximately two-mile round trip around a serene lake with opportunities to spot local wildlife like deer or waterfowl.

4. Historic Military Site Trails: These trails wind through old bunkers, gun batteries, and other remnants from World War II era Fort Stevens; they vary in length but are generally flat and accessible for most hikers.

5. Trestle Bay & Clatsop Spit Loop Hike: It's an adventurous trek covering nearly ten miles along sandy beaches where you can see shipwrecks at low tide as well as plenty of birdlife on Trestle Bay's mudflats.

6. Fort To Sea Trail: The longest trail within the park stretching over six:miles one way leading from historical sites near Hammond towards Sunset Beach offering diverse scenery including forests, wetlands,and beachfronts.

7. Peter Iredale Shipwreck Walk: Short walk (less than half mile) directly to famous Peter Iredale ship wreck which ran aground in October 1906.

8. Hammond Marina Viewpoint Walk: Easy walking path providing stunning marina view points, ideal place for picnic too.

Visitor Comments, Memories and Reviews
December 15
park review stars; one to five
May 9 Very nice family park
park review stars; one to five Spent two nights here in April. We had made reservations, but on arriving found we were in a loop with many many small kids - we told local ranger and he directed us to reservation center where folks told us just to cruise around and find a spot more to our liking, which we did. Finally found a more secluded spot where we spent two delightful nights. Lots to do here - we hiked to the beach to view an old shipwreck and also drove to Fort Stevens and viewed extremely interesting military base - been here over 100 years! I recommend this State Park - but be prepared for lots of kids on bikes and skateboards.
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Area Campgrounds
Astoria / Warrenton / Seaside KOA Resort
1100 Northwest Ridge Road
Warrenton, OR
503-861-2606
Thousand Trails Seaside
1703 12th Avenue
Seaside, OR
503-738-0626
Nearby Hotels
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Directions
Fort Stevens State Park is located in the state of Oregon, near Astoria. To reach Fort Stevens from Portland, follow US-30 W for approximately 90 miles until you arrive at Warrenton. Once in Warrenton, continue on US-101 N and take a left onto NW Ridge Road to enter the park.

If you are coming from Seattle or other areas north of Astoria, head south on I-5 S towards Longview/Kelso. Take exit 36 toward WA-432/Long Beach/Astoria Bridge and merge onto Washington Way/WA-433 S/N Kelso Ave. Continue over the bridge into Oregon where it becomes Lewis & Clark Bridge/Oregon Hwy 433 S/Columbia St., then turn right onto Commercial St./US Highway 30 E/OR-Hwy-A1 Spur E before merging with OR-US HWY A1 SPUR/SR202 (signs for U.S.-Astoria). Follow this road as it turns into Young's Bay Drive/HWY A3 Loop Rd/Military Rd until reaching NW Ridge Road which leads directly to Fort Stevens State Park.

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Oregon State Parks

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